Infinite Ideas publishes the best wine books in the world and the most interesting business books we can find. We’re firm believers in pursuing what we love and what interests us, and we love wine and believe business is the most dynamic social force on the planet. Our wine books help enthusiasts and professionals to understand wine better. Our business books help leaders at all levels to make sense of their business environments, their careers and the convulsive changes that are continuously reshaping both.  
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Extract: The wines of Georgia by Lisa Granik MW

Extract: The wines of Georgia by Lisa Granik MW

13 June 2022 by in Classic Wine Library, Extracts, Wine and spirits

Qvevri: the vessel of dreams
Qvevri are the clay vessels used for making wines according to the traditional Georgian winemaking method. (In western Georgia they are called churi.) They are found in the marani, more wine storage shed than cellar in some cases, but it can be a perfectly designed cellar. (Read more)

Extract: Côte d’Or by Raymond Blake

Extract: Côte d’Or by Raymond Blake

8 June 2022 by in Classic Wine Library, Extracts, Wine and spirits

Principal vineyards of the Côte de Nuits
For many people, their mind’s eye picture of the Côte d’Or stretches from Gevrey-Chambertin, the first commune that is home to grand cru vineyards, to the last, Chassagne-Montrachet. Until recently this was a safe mental attenuation, lopping off the northern and southern country cousins and not paying much heed either to some others in between, such as Prémeaux-Prissey or Saint-Romain. (Read more)

Extract: The wines of Great Britain by Stephen Skelton MW

Extract: The wines of Great Britain by Stephen Skelton MW

30 May 2022 by in Classic Wine Library, Extracts, Wine and spirits

Sparkling wine
The production of sparkling wine in Britain – although not from home-grown grapes – is verifiably over 350 years old, and we know from the two papers read at the newly founded Royal Society in December 1662 that sugar added to a fermented product and sealed in a bottle with a tightly bound stopper produced a ‘brisk and sparkling’ product. (Read more)