Business

Over the last 14 years we have built up an impressive range of business books to help organizations, managers and students of business get more out of work.

Our authors include the world’s foremost cross-cultural management guru, Fons Trompenaars, currently #33 in the Thinkers50 global ranking of top management thinkers, ex-Burger King CEO Barry Gibbons and ‘The Lazy Project Manager’, Peter Taylor. We aim to publish the most interesting and thought-provoking business books around. We co-publish with Thinkers50, including The giving world: the three financial forces that could transform global development by Mona Hammami Hijazi. We also publish books by Stuart Crainer and Des Dearlove, the celebrated founders of Thinkers50, including the ‘What we mean when we talk about business’ series.

Our books cover a range of business subjects, from practical guides such as the bestselling Implementing ISO 9001:2015, which is a must-have tool for any company wishing to update to the new ISO standard, and 100+ management models, by Fons Trompenaars and Piet-Hein Coebergh, a handy reference guide for anyone studying management in higher education that was recently voted the best business book published in south east Asia.

Business books image website

The business world changes as we write. We have tried to capture this with Michael Bayler’s trailblazing guide to the new economy, The liquid enterprise, which throws down the gauntlet to the leaders of tomorrow by providing a radical rethink of how the new Network Dynamics drive markets and how we must overturn the principles of traditional business strategy in order to survive and thrive in the unforgiving, chaotic environment that is the market in 2016. At the same time businesses need some practical help and we have published Tim Philips’ Data-driven business: use real-life numbers to improve your performance by 352% to show how businesses can use real evidence (cautiously) to predict scenarios.

We also think that business can be fun (seriously) and we have published Game of Thrones on Business which offers helpful business strategy tips from the Seven Kingdoms. We’re not the only ones who think that our books are the best around; Game of Thrones on Business was shortlisted for the Chartered Management Institute Management Book of the Year. Working with The Walking Dead: winning strategies in a workplace zombie apocalypse shows how another global blockbuster can help with your career, and Alice in strategy land: Mad hatter’s meetings, corporate rabbit holes and how to manage your flamingo shows how to turn Lewis Carroll’s surreal imagination to your strategic advantage. Last and by no means least the ideas in Kate Cook’s wellness plan: 80 energising steps to a whole new you will help you make positive changes that will enhance your work life and leave you with energy to spare at the end of the working day for your family, friends and fun. Maybe you’ll even be able to watch Game of Thrones without drifting off to sleep ten minutes in!


The best business card you’ll ever have

“A published book (accent on ‘published’) can bring a string of powerful indirect benefits. It can boost a CV. It can take the place of a business card, with 1000 times the impact. It can open up lucrative speaking or consulting opportunities. It can enhance an author’s reputation in a defined target market.”

Barry Gibbons, former CEO Burger King and author of six books including
If You Want to Make God Really Laugh Show Him Your Business Plan: 101 Universal Laws of Business


“Having my book published by a recognised publisher was the most significant thing that I could do to add value to my business. (Read more)

Corporate wellness

Switched-on organisations know that happy and healthy employees are more creative, engaged and productive.

One certain way to give your company a boost is to encourage employees to live healthy, happy lives. But with reams of information out there on health, fitness and well-being it can be difficult to find the most useful information. (Read more)

Infinite Success

We can learn a lot from the past. Over the course of human history a great deal has been written about getting through life, tackling its inevitable challenges and making a success of the three score years and ten we’ve been allotted.

Unfortunately a lot of these ideas can seem inaccessible: the books appear to relate only to the time they were written in, the style is unapproachable and many of them look as though they’d be more use propping open a door than helping us make sense of our lives. (Read more)